Hiking Parks in Nova Scotia

Hiking Parks in Nova Scotia



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Lawrencetown Beach

Lawrencetown Beach is noted for its surf, and is a mainstay of surfers living here or visiting the province. Surfing instruction and outfitters located near the park. There is supervised swimming (July – August/STC). Strong rip tides and currents are common - swimmers must exercise caution. Provincially and regionally significant coastal park system; includes regionally significant beach parks, proximity to rails to trails corridor, Trans Canada Trail passes through Cole Harbour Heritage Park

Lennox Passage

A pleasant park on Isle Madame with two kilometres of shoreline, an operating lighthouse and site of a former post office (c.1910), ferry terminal and two limestone quarries. Picnic in forest or open areas, enjoy the 2 km of trails, or explore the lighthouse. Snowshoeing and cross-country skiing opportunities in the winter, however parking is available at the gate only. Located on Hwy 320, 5 km (3 mi) east of the junction of Routes 320 and 206.

MacElmons Pond

Adjacent to a headpond and wildlife management area. The rich waters of the headpond support a small population of American widgeon as well as being an important staging area for migratory waterfowl.

A 1 km (1/2 mi) trail meanders through reclaimed pasture, a pine forest and alongside the lake.  Popular location for fall foliage photography.  

McNabs and Lawlor Islands

Located at the mouth of Halifax Harbour, the park carries visitors back in time, and back to nature. Just a short boat trip (commercial providers offer service) from various points in the metro area. Military and history buffs, birders, and hikers will be enthralled with this park’s intriguing past and beautiful natural surroundings so close to the dynamic downtown.

Mickey Hill

Popular system of graveled hiking trails along Lambs Lake. The park features boardwalks in rough areas and staircases through rocks. There is a picnic area on the river, as well as an unsupervised beach on the lake.

Accessible Facilities
Electrical Hook-up

Mira River

Jutting out into the famous Mira River and only minutes from Sydney or Fortress Louisbourg National Historic site, Mira River Provincial Park is the perfect escape.

North River

This park has 18 kms of trails providing access to a spectacular steep-sided river canyon with deep salmon pools that leads to a beautiful 32 metre (104 foot) waterfall. Located 3.5 km off the Cabot Trail at North River bridge.

Oakfield

A popular day-use park on Shubenacadie-Grand Lake featuring a small beach (supervised July – August/STC) and a boat launch for motorized craft. Picnic tables, vault toilets, walking trails nearby, and ample parking. Well suited to group events such as corporate picnics or reunions. Camping nearby at Laurie Park.

Petersfield

This park has a significant cultural history as it contains remnants of four cultural periods, dating from the late 18th to mid-20th centuries. Explore the 7 km (4.5 mi) of trails. 

Port Hood Station

Popular picnic spot with a cobble beach and adjacent to white sand beach.

Port L’Hebert

Park features a 2.1 km (1.3 mi.) looped trail through hardwoods and granite boulders left by retreating glaciers. Trail provides a pleasant walk to an attractive view of the coast. Site is adjacent a federal migratory bird sanctuary and near Thomas Raddall Provincial Park and Kejimkujik National Park Seaside Adjunct.

Accessible Facilities
Electrical Hook-up

Porters Lake

Quiet lakeside setting offers a wide range of outdoor opportunities including camping, boating, canoeing, water skiing, fishing, and swimming.

Powells Point

A large day-use park with shoreline access to the warmest salt water in Nova Scotia. Sandy beach on one side, rocky on the other. Some winter recreation opportunities such as snow shoeing and cross-country skiing. Located off Hwy 348, about 6 km (3.7 mi) northeast of Trenton.

Accessible Facilities
Electrical Hook-up

Rissers Beach

A beautiful white sand beach and boardwalk along an inland marsh provide the perfect setting for swimming, beachcombing or relaxing in the sun. 

Accessible Facilities

Ross Ferry

Community managed day-use area offering a boat launch to the Bras d’Or Lake.

Sackville Lakes

A natural environment park offering an attractive forest setting in a near-urban area for walking and hiking as well as lake access for canoeing or kayaking. Trail development and management by a community group.

Salt Springs

Nestled against the banks of the West River, this park makes a great rest stop for travellers. Picnic just off the highway, or down by the river. Unsupervised swimming at the river. Cross country skiing, snowshoeing. Located just off Hwy 104, Exit 19, 17 km (10 mi) west of New Glasgow.

Accessible Facilities

Shubenacadie Provincial Wildlife Park

Set in natural woodlands this park is home to more than 30 native animals and birds, as well as some exotics.  The Wetland Centre features interactive displays on wetlands.

Admission fees apply.  Visit the website

Accessible Facilities

Smileys

Abundant gypsum deposits have influenced the landscape and vegetation in and around the park. Home to rare plants and fossils, Smileys also protects stands of yellow birch and hemlock.  Bordered by the Meander River where you can fish or pan for gold. 

St Anns

Scenic view overlooking a saltmarsh and bay. A 500 m trail meanders by the water offering opportunities to view various waterfowl and other birds.

Accessible Facilities

Taylor Head

Located southwest of Sheet Harbour, this park occupies a rugged wind swept peninsula that juts 6 km (3.7 mi) into the Atlantic Ocean. The park's hiking trails provide access to a variety of natural aspects, interesting geological features, wildlife habitat, scenic lookoffs, secluded beaches and 16 km (10 mi.) of unspoiled coastline.

Accessible Facilities

Thomas Raddall

Overlooking Port Joli Harbour on Nova Scotia's South Shore with over 650 ha (1,600 acres) the park offers visitors a wide range of outdoor experiences, including hiking, camping, picnicing, sight-seeing, or relaxing on the beach.

Accessible Facilities

Tor Bay

Picturesque picnic area on a rocky point looking out to the open Atlantic, 8 km (5 mi) south of Larry's River. Sweeping sand beaches; boardwalks and interpretive displays describing natural environment as well as historical significance of this site as landing point for first trans-Atlantic cable.

Uisge Bàn Falls

Enjoy this 1.5 kilometre round trip hike amid beautiful hardwoods to a spectacular 15 m waterfall in a granite gorge.

Located 14.5 kilometres (9 miles) north of Baddeck. From Highway 105, take Exit 9.